Can Cops Tell If You Have Insurance By Running Plates

Insurance By Running Plates

A vehicle/auto insurance is required if you are an owner of cars, trucks, motorcycles, and other road vehicles. It is a very important insurance policy because it provides financial protection against physical damage or bodily injury due to traffic collisions. Moreover, auto insurance can protect you from financial liability, medical expenses, and legal consequences.

Nowadays, cops can tell if you have insurance by running your plates. When you are stopped by traffic police, the first thing they check is your insurance. The police don’t have to call the number on the ID card to verify the insurance policy and its status. They can check the insurance by accessing a web portal and use the license plate number to review the real-time status of insurance data of a specific vehicle.

Do Police Use ALPR Systems When Checking On Proof Of Insurance?

ALPR stands for Automated License Plate Readers. ALPRs are high-speed, computer-controlled camera systems. ALPRs are used to automatically capture an image of the vehicle’s license plate and then transform the image into alphanumeric characters. Finally, compare the plate number from the image to one or more databases and check the insurance policy. Usually, the ALPRs are installed on street poles, street lights, and other relevant locations. ALPRs remain focused on the license plate numbers of the vehicles, collect the data, and then tag them with geolocation and timestamp data. Though this technology is fairly new; police of Texas and Virginia have successfully used this technology to check auto insurance and reduce the number of uninsured drivers.

The Consequence Of Not Having Insurance

Driving without insurance poses a great risk, therefore, makes sure you are ready to pay the consequences. If you can’t show the insurance to the police then you are in great trouble because officers don’t take this type of offense lightly. The reason is, when you are driving without insurance, you’re putting the financial health of others at risk. When you are stopped by police officers, you have to show proof of your insurance. Moreover, the officers will also check the insurance and see if it is valid. If you are asked for proof of insurance and you don’t have it then you could face fines ranging from $100 to $175. Moreover, you might face additional penalties if you don’t have coverage at all. They are:

1. You can be cited for a misdemeanor and ordered a mandatory court appearance

2. You will be ordered to pay a fine for driving uninsured

3. You will be asked to provide current proof of insurance

4. You may be ordered by the court to submit an SR-22 for future verification

5. You will have a no insurance violation on your driving record

6. Your vehicle may be impounded and you will have to pay towing, storage, and impound fee

What Types Of Car Insurance Are Mandatory?

Different auto insurance offers different coverage in the event of an accident. So if you are wondering what types of car insurance is mandatory or best for you then check the below table:

Insurance CoverageRange Of Mandatory LimitsWho And What It Benefits
Bodily injury (BI) liability$15,000 to $50,000 per person/$30,000 to $100,000 per accidentAnother driver’s injuries
Property damage (PD) liability$5,000 to $25,000 per accidentAnother driver’s car or property damage
Uninsured/Underinsured motorist BI$20,000 to $50,000 per person/$40,000 to $100,000 per accidentYour injuries, if the other driver is not insured
Uninsured/Underinsured motorist PD$5,000 to $25,000 per accidentYour car damage, if the other driver is not insured
Personal injury protection (PIP)/Medical benefits$1,000 to $50,000Your injuries and your passengers’ injuries

Minimum Car Insurance Limits In Each State

StateBodily injury (BI)Property damage (PD)
Alabama$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Alaske$50,000 per person/ $100,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Arizona$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$15,000 per accident
Arkansas$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
California$15,000 per person/ $30,000 per accident$5,000 per accident
Colorado$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$15,000 per accident
Connecticut$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Delaware$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
FloridaNone$10,000 per accident
Georgia$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Hawaii$20,000 per person/ $40,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
Idaho$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$15,000 per accident
Illinois$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$20,000 per accident
Indiana$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Lowa$20,000 per person/ $40,000 per accident$15,000 per accident
Kansas$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Kentucky$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Louisiana$15,000 per person/ $30,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Maine$50,000 per person/ $100,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Maryland$30,000 per person/ $60,000 per accident$15,000 per accident
Massachusetts$20,000 per person/ $40,000 per accident$5,000 per accident
Michigan$50,000 per person/ $100,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
Minnesota$30,000 per person/ $60,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
Mississippi$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Missouri$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Montana$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Nebraska$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Nevada$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
New Hampshire$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
New Jersey$15,000 per person/ $30,000 per accident$5,000 per accident
New Mexico$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
New York$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
North Carolina$30,000 per person/ $60,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
North Dakota$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Ohio$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Oklahoma$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Oregon$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$20,000 per accident
Pennsylvania$15,000 per person/ $30,000 per accident$5,000 per accident
Rhode Island$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
South Carolina$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
South Dakota$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Tennessee$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$15,000 per accident
Texas$30,000 per person/ $60,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Utah$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$15,000 per accident
Vermont$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
Virginia$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$20,000 per accident
Washington$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
Washington D.C.$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
West Virginia$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$25,000 per accident
Wisconsin$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$10,000 per accident
Wyoming$25,000 per person/ $50,000 per accident$20,000 per accident

Last Updated on May 18, 2021 by Musa D

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